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September 6, 2022

 

 

Our Top Stories

 
Tears at a military church
 

Tears at a military church

 

Fifty years after preaching his first sermon, Ron Edwards jokes that he knows the secret to ministry.

Change churches every three years.

Actually, Edwards — who is retiring from full-time preaching — spent the past 37 years serving the Roosevelt Drive Church of Christ in a military community about 120 miles southeast of Raleigh, N.C.

Given the transitory nature of Marines and Navy sailors, it just seemed like his home church kept changing.

Bobby Ross Jr. reports from Jacksonville, N.C.

 
 

 
‘Action on climate change … is an act of love’
 

‘Action on climate change … is an act of love’

 

Over the last 10 years, Jaime Green and her husband estimate that they have worked on more than 75 natural disasters with Churches of Christ Disaster Relief Effort Inc., based out of Nashville, Tenn.

Floods, hurricanes, tornadoes — Green has helped with them all.

But while she attributes the weather patterns and the frequency of natural disasters to climate change caused by human consumption, other Christians aren’t so sure.

Audrey Jackson reports.

 
Oklahoma parsonage burns down during Sunday worship
 
  News  
 
 

Oklahoma parsonage burns down during Sunday worship

 

Worship services for the McLoud Church of Christ in Oklahoma were interrupted Sunday when its parsonage caught fire.

Read the full story.

 
 

 
A real thrill ride: Visiting a church on vacation
 

A real thrill ride: Visiting a church on vacation

 

Walking up to the Ball Road Church of Christ was nearly as nerve-wracking as waiting in line for Big Thunder Mountain Railroad.

But I had conquered my fear of the train-themed roller coaster — and even enjoyed it; we did it three times — so maybe this experience would be a good one, too.

The small congregation was only a short walk from our hotel. It took us half as long to reach the church building as it took us to walk to Disneyland and California Adventure, where we’d spent the past four days.

Still, I had considered just playing it safe and watching our home congregation’s Sunday service online in our hotel room. I mean, what would Bible class be like here? Would there even be a place for my girls?

Erik Tryggestad’s Insight column from Anaheim, Calif.

 
Voices only: ‘Are You Washed in the Blood of the Lamb’ in Swahili — plus a bunch of handshakes
 

Voices only: ‘Are You Washed in the Blood of the Lamb’ in Swahili — plus a bunch of handshakes

 

This village is “up” (“juu” in Swahili) in the mountains of this East African nation.

And numbers are up at the Church of Christ here, too. I got up — from my seat — as the service began to take a few photos and quickly lost my spot. Soon, the benches were full of souls, young and old. I grabbed a plastic chair and found a place toward the back of the building. It’s a good problem to have.

Part of the reason for the good Sunday turnout is the rows of giant, white tanks outside the church building. The congregation has installed a rainwater collection system and shares with its community. Church members, under the direction of missionary Ralph Williams, installed a similar system at a medical dispensary just up the hill from the church building last year.

Erik Tryggestad reports from Tanzania.

 
Fishing for men by restoring the spirit of Christianity
 

Fishing for men by restoring the spirit of Christianity

 

The apostle Peter was called from his fishing boat to become a “fisher of men.” Little did he know the call to “follow me” meant he would spend the majority of his remaining life as a cultural transplant in foreign lands.

Two thousand years later, cultural transplants from three different continents have been called by God to live as spiritual exiles. “Renewal Through Restoration: An Uncommon Call to Christian Discipleship” shares the common commitment of these men to restore, not just the letter, but the spirit of early Christianity.

Dale Hartman reviews the new book.

 
Is Nashville the center of the religion news universe? For today, let’s say so
 

Is Nashville the center of the religion news universe? For today, let’s say so

 

Twenty years ago, I moved to Nashville, Tenn., to work for The Associated Press.

I spent less than a year in Music City before transferring to Dallas, but oh, what a fun 11 months for a religion reporter (and country music fan).

I covered the fight over a proposed Tennessee lottery and a prayer service on the night the Iraq War began, but some of my favorite stories were less weighty.

Bobby Ross Jr. reflects on his Nashville experience in his Weekend Plug-in column.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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